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CATONSVILLE NINE COMMEMORATION ACTIVITIES

May 5 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Films, Lectures, Discussion Panels, Sign Dedication and Dramatic Readings

 

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM Videos:  UMBC Film Student Interviews of Local Catonsville
Nine- Related Activists & A Montage of Lynne Sachs’ Interviews of members of the Catonsville Nine
 
at the Catonsville Library Meeting Room (Downstairs)

 

Film:  UMBC Film Student’s Local Interviews

 

 

 

9:30 AM – 10:15 AM Paul Magno – Catonsville to Kings Bay: The Catonsville 9 and the Plowshares Movement  at the Catonsville Presbyterian Church

 

 

 

10:30 AM – 11:45 AM Amy Goodman Keynote Speech at the Catonsville Presbyterian Church

 

Amy Goodman is an American broadcast journalist, syndicated columnist, investigative reporter, and author.  Since 1996, Goodman has hosted Democracy Now!, an independent global news program broadcast daily on radio, television and the Internet. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Thomas Merton Award in 2004, a Right Livelihood Award in 2008, and an Izzy Award in 2009 for “special achievement in independent media”. In 2016, she was criminally charged in connection with her coverage of protests of the Dakota Access pipeline.

 

 

 

 

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Catonsville Resident’s Discussion at the Catonsville Library Meeting Room (Downstairs)

 

Moderator: Prof. Rebecca Boehling

Rebecca Boehling is professor of history and director of the Global Studies and Judaic Studies Programs at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where she has taught since 1989.  She is the author of A Question of Priorities: Democratic Reform and Economic Recovery in Postwar Germany (Berghahn Books: Providence and Oxford, 1996) and together with Uta Larkey, Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust: A Jewish Family’s Untold Story (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2011). From 2013-2015 she directed the International Tracing Service (ITS) in Germany, a documentation center founded by the Allies at the end of World War II. She is currently working on a study of denazification as transitional justice in the British, French and United States zones of occupied Germany.

Participants: Delegate Eric Ebersole, Bill Galvin, John Lingan, David Hutton

Eric Ebersole is a Catonsville native who has served as a high school math teacher in for 35 years, and more recently, as a State Delegate representing District 12.  He was born to a family of teachers and is an alumnus of Catonsville High School. He attended the University of Maryland, College Park and graduated summa cum laude in the College of Education. He would later return to obtain his Masters of Science in Math Education. Eric has been an active member of the community ever since. He served as an instructor and mentor for thousands of students at Wilde Lake High School for over 20 years. While there, he was an adviser for the Student Government Association and National Honor Society.

Bill Galvin is a Vietnam era conscientious objector, whose CO application was denied by the Catonsville draft board. He is an elder at Hope Presbyterian Church in Arbutus, MD. Inspired by the witness of the Catonsville 9, Bill was part of the York 5. He has supported COs his entire adult life and is currently the Counseling Coordinator at the Center on Conscience & War in Washington, DC.  Bill serves on the Executive Committee of the Presbyterian Peace Fellowship and the board of the GI Rights Hotline. He received the Presbyterian Peace Fellowship’s 2009 Peaceseeker Award, and the Washington Peace Center’s 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award. A former chair of the National Campaign for a Peace Tax Fund, Bill has has written a guide for conscientious objectors in the military.
 John Lingan is the author of Homeplace: A Southern Town, a Country Legend, and the Last Days of a Mountaintop Honky-Tonk, which will be published in July. He has written for many outlets, including The New York Times Magazine, the Oxford American, BuzzFeed, and Pacific Standard, where his essay on the Catonsville Nine’s contemporary relevance appeared in the 2015 Unlikely Patriots series. He grew up on Park Grove Avenue, attended Hillcrest Elementary School, and spent most of his adolescence biking between Record & Tape Traders and Five Oaks Pool.
 David Hutton is a Catonsville native, having grown up in the Westchester neighborhood near Oella, and graduated from Catonsville Senior High School in 1963.  After graduation from the University of Delaware with an engineering degree in 1967, he was employed by Baltimore Aircoil Company, and his draft status was listed as 1-A.  The company applied for an occupational deferment on his behalf.  On May 17, 1968, David Hutton’s 23rd birthday, the Catonsville Nine burned the draft records at the Catonsville Selective Service Office, presumably including Mr. Hutton’s record.  Nonetheless, his occupational deferment was granted, and he was never drafted.  Mr. Hutton worked his entire career with Baltimore Aircoil, and is now semi-retired and is still a Catonsville resident.

 

 

1:00 PM – 2:15 PM The Meaning of Catonsville (Observers) at the Catonsville Presbyterian Church

 

Moderator: Frank Cordaro

Frank Cordaro co-founded the DMCW in Aug 1976. Frank has spent his life supporting and living at the DMCW, served as a Catholic priest in the DM Diocese, was a member of the God’s for Metal Plowshares in May 1998, An active practitioner of civil disobedience, he protests and gets arrested for peace and justice in the areas of Prisons, Death Penalty, Corporate Ag, Immigration and Human Rights, the homeless, abortions, Nukes and the US Imperialism. Frank has logged close to 6 years of jail time. Dan and Phil Berrigan has been his Rabbi’s, & the CW movement is his clan and the US Catholic Left, is the Faith tradition he walks with. Current issues: Oil Pipelines, Corporate Ag and the DM Drone Command Center.

Panelists: Amy Goodman, Frank Cordaro, Col. Ann Wright, Bruce Goldfarb, Kathy Kelly, Hillel Arnold, Frida Berrigan

Amy Goodman is an American broadcast journalist, syndicated columnist, investigative reporter, and author.  Since 1996, Goodman has hosted Democracy Now!, an independent global news program broadcast daily on radio, television and the Internet. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Thomas Merton Award in 2004, a Right Livelihood Award in 2008, and an Izzy Award in 2009 for “special achievement in independent media”. In 2016, she was criminally charged in connection with her coverage of protests of the Dakota Access pipeline.

 Ann Wright was in the U.S. Army/Army Reserves for 29 years and retired as a Colonel.  She was also a U.S. diplomat for 16 years and served in U.S. Embassies in Nicaragua, Grenada, Somalia, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan and Mongolia.  She resigned from the U.S. government in March 2003 in opposition to Bush’s war on Iraq and since then has been very active in anti-war and social justice issues.  She is the co-author of “Dissent: Voices of Conscience.”
 Bruce Goldfarb is a Baltimore writer and publisher of WelcomeToBaltimoreHon.com.
Kathy Kelly has traveled to war zones and lived alongside ordinary people in Afghanistan, Iraq, Gaza, Lebanon, Bosnia and Nicaragua.  She and her companions in Voices for Creative Nonviolence believe the U.S. should end all U.S. military and economic warfare and pay reparations for suffering caused by U.S. wars. Kelly has traveled to Iraq 27 times; she and her companions lived in Baghdad throughout the 2003 “Shock and Awe” bombing. She was sentenced to one year in federal prison for planting corn on nuclear missile silo sites (1988-89) at Whiteman Air Force Base and spent three months in prison, in 2004, for crossing the line at Fort Benning’s military training school. As a war tax refuser, she has refused payment of all forms of federal income tax since 1980.
Hillel Arnold is an archivist, activist and musician. Drawn by his lifelong love of radical folk music, he interned at the Woody Guthrie Archives, where he fell in love with the creative and liberative potential of archives. He has worked at NYU’s Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, the Foundation for Landscape Studies, and is currently the Head of Digital Programs at the Rockefeller Archive Center. Hillel seeks to bring human-centered design practices to archival technology. He is interested in the relationship between archives and state power. He holds an MA in History from New York University and an MLIS from the Long Island University’s Palmer School.
 Frida Berrigan is a columnist for Waging Nonviolence and the author of It Runs in the Family: On Being Raised by Radicals and Growing into Rebellious Motherhood. She lives in New London, Conn. with her husband Patrick and their three children.

 

 

 

 

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM Videos:  UMBC Film Student Interviews of Local Catonsville
Nine- Related Activists & A Montage of Lynne Sachs’ Interviews of members of the Catonsville Nine
 
at the Catonsville Library Meeting Room (Downstairs)

 

Film:  UMBC Film Student’s Local Interviews

 

 

 

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM Catonsville Nine Historical Marker Dedication Ceremony Outside of the Catonsville Library

 

MC: Dave Goldsmith

Dave Goldsmith has a Master’s degree in History from UMBC with an emphasis on US political history. He is a member of the Maryland Green Party and former Green Party candidate for public office.  Dave owns and operates a computer company in Baltimore County that specializes in supporting SOHOs (Small Offices / Home Offices.)

Read Dave’s Catonsville Nine Historic Marker Dedication Ceremony Address.

Speakers: Margarita Melville, Frida Berrigan, Bob Graff, Dave Eberhardt, Brendon Walsh

Margarita Bradford Furber (Marjorie Melville) was born in Mexico in 1929 of an American father and a British/Mexican mother.  After graduating high school she entered the Maryknoll Sisters, a missionary order in Ossining, New York. In 1954 she went to Guatemala where met Brother John Hogan and her future husband Father Thomas Melville, both Maryknoll Missioners.  Because of their activities and the beginning of a revolutionary guerrilla movement, they were ordered to leave Guatemala and return to the U.S.  Friends in Washington DC put them in contact with George Mische and they went to live at his house.  It was there that they met and joined the group who were to become known as the Catonsville Nine.

 Frida Berrigan is a columnist for Waging Nonviolence and the author of It Runs in the Family: On Being Raised by Radicals and Growing into Rebellious Motherhood. She lives in New London, Conn. with her husband Patrick and their three children.
Bob Graf is a resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he was born and raised. After high school, Bob was a scholastic in the Society of Jesus for seven years. After leaving the Jesuits in 1968 he lived in the local Catholic Worker community where he met his wife, Patricia, with whom he has been married for 49 years. He was a member of the Milwaukee 14, which followed the Catonsville 9 action. Over the last 50 years, Bob was a co-founder of an alternative high school, a community organizer, business owner, educator and youth minister. Since retiring he has been active in peace and social justice issues in Milwaukee like eliminating military off a Catholic campus and struggles for social justice in the city. He spends time advocating, visiting and providing transportation for people in need.
 David Eberhardt was born March 26, 1941. As a peace protester, he was incarcerated at Lewisburg Federal Prison in 1970 for 21 months for pouring blood on draft files with Father Philip Berrigan and two others to protest the Vietnam War. He is retired after 33 years of work in the criminal injustice system as a Director of Offender Aid and Restoration at the Baltimore City Jail. He has published three books of poetry: The Tree Calendar, Blue Running Lights, and Poems from the Website, Poetry in Baltimore. His memoir is available from Amazon: For All the Saints.
Brendan Walsh co-founded Viva House, Baltimore Catholic Worker in 1968 with his wife, Willa Bickham. So Viva House and Catonsville 9 are both celebrating a 50th anniversary. Brendan was part of that day in Catonsville. He was part of the defense committee in support of this draft board raid. He helped organize marches, vigils, protests, speakers and gatherings during the Federal and State trials. In a recently published book, “THE LONG LONELINESS IN BALTIMORE”, Brendan tells some of the stories of the past 50 years, and the book has Willa’s art work.

 

 

 

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM The Meaning of Catonsville (Participants) at the Catonsville Presbyterian Church

 

Moderator: Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman is an American broadcast journalist, syndicated columnist, investigative reporter, and author.  Since 1996, Goodman has hosted Democracy Now!, an independent global news program broadcast daily on radio, television and the Internet. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Thomas Merton Award in 2004, a Right Livelihood Award in 2008, and an Izzy Award in 2009 for “special achievement in independent media”. In 2016, she was criminally charged in connection with her coverage of protests of the Dakota Access pipeline.

Panelists: Margarita Melville, Frida Berrigan, Dave Eberhardt, Bob Graff, Keith Forsythe, Willa Bickham

Margarita Bradford Furber (Marjorie Melville) was born in Mexico in 1929 of an American father and a British/Mexican mother.  After graduating high school she entered the Maryknoll Sisters, a missionary order in Ossining, New York. In 1954 she went to Guatemala where met Brother John Hogan and her future husband Father Thomas Melville, both Maryknoll Missioners.  Because of their activities and the beginning of a revolutionary guerrilla movement, they were ordered to leave Guatemala and return to the U.S.  Friends in Washington DC put them in contact with George Mische and they went to live at his house.  It was there that they met and joined the group who were to become known as the Catonsville Nine.

 Frida Berrigan is a columnist for Waging Nonviolence and the author of It Runs in the Family: On Being Raised by Radicals and Growing into Rebellious Motherhood. She lives in New London, Conn. with her husband Patrick and their three children.
 David Eberhardt was born March 26, 1941. As a peace protester, he was incarcerated at Lewisburg Federal Prison in 1970 for 21 months for pouring blood on draft files with Father Philip Berrigan and two others to protest the Vietnam War. He is retired after 33 years of work in the criminal injustice system as a Director of Offender Aid and Restoration at the Baltimore City Jail. He has published three books of poetry: The Tree Calendar, Blue Running Lights, and Poems from the Website, Poetry in Baltimore. His memoir is available from Amazon: For All the Saints.
 Bob Graf is a resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he was born and raised. After high school, Bob was a scholastic in the Society of Jesus for seven years. After leaving the Jesuits in 1968 he lived in the local Catholic Worker community where he met his wife, Patricia, with whom he has been married for 49 years. He was a member of the Milwaukee 14, which followed the Catonsville 9 action. Over the last 50 years, Bob was a co-founder of an alternative high school, a community organizer, business owner, educator and youth minister. Since retiring he has been active in peace and social justice issues in Milwaukee like eliminating military off a Catholic campus and struggles for social justice in the city. He spends time advocating, visiting and providing transportation for people in need.
 Keith Forsyth was born in Marion Ohio in 1950, and have lived in Philadelphia since 1970.  His involvement in politics began in 1968 by working against the Vietnam War, first in a local group in rural Ohio and later as a member of the New Mobe, NPAC, the Mayday Tribe, and other organizations.  He got involved with the “Catholic Left” in 1970, including participation in the Media FBI action and the Camden 28 draft action in 1971.  Later that year his focus switched to community organizing and later to union organizing, which he continued until leaving political work in 1980.  After a long hiatus, he began working on government surveillance issues a few years ago, and shortly after retiring in 2015 switched his focus to organizing against gerrymandering as part of the organization Fair Districts PA.
 Willa Bickham has worked with Brendan in west Baltimore to do the essence of the Catholic Worker movement:  hospitality and resistance. This work has included a soup kitchen, Food Pantry, and an after school program, and a law center among other works. The first guests at Viva Houses were the Catonsville 9 and their families.  Willa worked on the defense committee for the Defendants in the Catonsville Nine Trial. Mary Moylan and John Hogan were the godparents for their daughter, Kate Walsh-Little. Tom Lewis and John Hogan lived at Viva House.

 

 

 

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Dramatic Reading of The Trial of the Catonsville Nine by the Salem Players at the Catonsville Library Meeting Room (Downstairs)

 

 The play is a dramatization written by Dan Berrigan of the trial of the nine defendants that followed their raid on the draft board in the Knights of Columbus building on Frederick Rd in May 1968 in which hundreds of draft records were destroyed. This dramatic reading will include multiple actors reading from various powerful portions of the text.  Opening night for the Salem Player’s production will be Thursday, May 17th, the 50th anniversary of the action at the Catonsville draft board.  A vigil will be held near the site of the 1968 action Just prior to the May 17th performance of the play.

 

 

 

Details

Date:
May 5
Time:
9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Event Categories:
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Venue

Catonsville Presbyterian Church and Catonsville Library
Catonsville, MD United States + Google Map